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Real Murders by Charlaine Harris
This time I was caught up by this book’s beautiful cover.
This is the first book in the Aurora Teagarden novels, in which a series of murders occur in a small town, inside a group of lovers of historical murders. The main character, Aurora Teagarden, is a single librarian that reminded me of Sookie Stackhouse more than once. The book is short and easy to read, and the ending is surprising which I guess is an important thing in mistery novels. Though this isn’t my favourite genre, I will read the next one, probably when nights are cold and I can snuggle up with a hot cappuccino.

Real Murders by Charlaine Harris

This time I was caught up by this book’s beautiful cover.

This is the first book in the Aurora Teagarden novels, in which a series of murders occur in a small town, inside a group of lovers of historical murders. The main character, Aurora Teagarden, is a single librarian that reminded me of Sookie Stackhouse more than once. The book is short and easy to read, and the ending is surprising which I guess is an important thing in mistery novels. Though this isn’t my favourite genre, I will read the next one, probably when nights are cold and I can snuggle up with a hot cappuccino.

Filed under aurora teagarden charlaine harris lit books real murders

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Dead Ever After, by Charlaine Harris
This is the last book in the Sookie Stackhouse novels. Much has been said and written online about it, good and bad, mostly bad. So I won’t go on about this and that, and even though my favourite book in the series is book 4, I think the ending of the series is as perfect as it can be. It is the ending I had been wishing for Sookie for some time now, the only possible happy ending.
So this time I’m not sad that one of my favourite series is over. I feel it lasted for as long as it should’ve, and with a happy ending. Also, I will read some of the books again and Sookie will always be one of my favourite characters ever.

Dead Ever After, by Charlaine Harris

This is the last book in the Sookie Stackhouse novels. Much has been said and written online about it, good and bad, mostly bad. So I won’t go on about this and that, and even though my favourite book in the series is book 4, I think the ending of the series is as perfect as it can be. It is the ending I had been wishing for Sookie for some time now, the only possible happy ending.

So this time I’m not sad that one of my favourite series is over. I feel it lasted for as long as it should’ve, and with a happy ending. Also, I will read some of the books again and Sookie will always be one of my favourite characters ever.

Filed under lit books sookie stackhouse dead ever after Southern Vampire charlaine harris true blood

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Now it is a strange thing, but things that are good to have and days that are good to spend are soon told about, and not much to listen to; while things that are unconfortable, palpitating, and even gruesome, may make a good tale, and take a deal of telling anyway.
The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien

Filed under quotes the hobbit tolkien

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The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
I tried to read The Hobbit  when I was about 15 years old. Back then I didn’t like it, I got confused with all the dwarves’ names and  I thought it was hard to read (which is strange, since it was originally written as a children’s book). After I watched the new film by Peter Jackson I decided I had to read it. Amazingly, I found out that the portuguese translation of the book was what was keeping me from liking it, because it gives a very serious and haughty tone to it (which I’m certain Tolkien would mock). So I read it in english and absolutely loved it. There is adventure and magic for sure, but also an always present sense of humour that surprised me. This book is an inspiration and a must read for all fantasy lovers.

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

I tried to read The Hobbit  when I was about 15 years old. Back then I didn’t like it, I got confused with all the dwarves’ names and  I thought it was hard to read (which is strange, since it was originally written as a children’s book). After I watched the new film by Peter Jackson I decided I had to read it. Amazingly, I found out that the portuguese translation of the book was what was keeping me from liking it, because it gives a very serious and haughty tone to it (which I’m certain Tolkien would mock). So I read it in english and absolutely loved it. There is adventure and magic for sure, but also an always present sense of humour that surprised me. This book is an inspiration and a must read for all fantasy lovers.

Filed under books lit the hobbit tolkien classic books

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The Host, by Stephenie Meyer
Back to great literature! I’m kidding! I actually like Stephenie Meyer and I think the idea for this book was pretty good. Earth was invaded by a strange species of aliens, who parasite human bodies to make them better, to save them from themselves and their destructive nature. Science fiction experts may argue that the idea isn’t completely new, but I still liked it. So the beginning of the book is very interesting and action occurs in good rythm, but at some point the story gets stuck and we find ourselves in a love triangle (or square) that just goes on forever. Similarities with previous books apart (really Stephenie Meyer, what’s up with the teenage love triangle?), I feel like the book lacks editing and it would be a lot better if it was shorter.
What I loved best about it were the descriptions of the american desert because they were very appealing to the senses. At some point I could almost feel the scent of the earth and the heat on my skin.

The Host, by Stephenie Meyer

Back to great literature! I’m kidding! I actually like Stephenie Meyer and I think the idea for this book was pretty good. Earth was invaded by a strange species of aliens, who parasite human bodies to make them better, to save them from themselves and their destructive nature. Science fiction experts may argue that the idea isn’t completely new, but I still liked it. So the beginning of the book is very interesting and action occurs in good rythm, but at some point the story gets stuck and we find ourselves in a love triangle (or square) that just goes on forever. Similarities with previous books apart (really Stephenie Meyer, what’s up with the teenage love triangle?), I feel like the book lacks editing and it would be a lot better if it was shorter.

What I loved best about it were the descriptions of the american desert because they were very appealing to the senses. At some point I could almost feel the scent of the earth and the heat on my skin.

Filed under books lit stephenie meyer the host

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No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty
Yes, yes, yes. This was the culprit! This insane guy had the insane idea of writing a novel in 30 days and making everyone else do it as well. After reading the first chapter of this book it’s too easy to go on board and actually think this is a good idea. Yes, he is that convincing. And the book, which is actually more like a guide, is really funny. 
You can learn more about it on http://nanowrimo.org/ but be warned, you might get into something amazingly crazy.
«But the human brain, if left to its own devices, would spend its entire adult life napping in front of the television. Ignore your brain. Toughen up.»

No Plot? No Problem! by Chris Baty

Yes, yes, yes. This was the culprit! This insane guy had the insane idea of writing a novel in 30 days and making everyone else do it as well. After reading the first chapter of this book it’s too easy to go on board and actually think this is a good idea. Yes, he is that convincing. And the book, which is actually more like a guide, is really funny.

You can learn more about it on http://nanowrimo.org/ but be warned, you might get into something amazingly crazy.

«But the human brain, if left to its own devices, would spend its entire adult life napping in front of the television. Ignore your brain. Toughen up.»

Filed under books lit chris baty no plot no problem nanowrimo

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Manuscrito Encontrado em Accra, by Paulo Coelho
This is a very straightfoward book in which a wise man gives life lessons to people facing imminent invasion of their city. Typical Paulo Coelho: when life gives you lemons, make some iced tea or whatever. It’s a nice book, full of wonderful quotes, but for some reason it didn’t quite fascinate me. Maybe because it’s all so theoretical, or maybe because deep inside ourselves we all know the life lessons the wise man is teaching. Nothing new there.

Manuscrito Encontrado em Accra, by Paulo Coelho

This is a very straightfoward book in which a wise man gives life lessons to people facing imminent invasion of their city. Typical Paulo Coelho: when life gives you lemons, make some iced tea or whatever. It’s a nice book, full of wonderful quotes, but for some reason it didn’t quite fascinate me. Maybe because it’s all so theoretical, or maybe because deep inside ourselves we all know the life lessons the wise man is teaching. Nothing new there.

Filed under books lit Paulo Coelho manuscrito encontrado em accra

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Back from… where?

Such a mess! After reading The Happiness Project I got myself into something so crazy that I lost track of my readings: I wrote a 50.000 word book.

It doesn’t have a name yet and is in need of so much editing that I haven’t brought myself around to start doing it. Nevertheless, it is there, and this tumblr is about to get back on track!

Filed under life events

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When I examined my reactions to other people, I realized that I do often view people who make critical remarks as more perceptive and more discriminating. At the same time, though, it’s hard to find pleasure in the company of someone who finds nothing pleasing. I prefer the company of the more enthusiastic types, who seem less judgmental, more vital, more fun.
in The Happiness Project, by Gretchen Rubin

Filed under the happiness project quotes books gretchen rubin Lit